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If this is your first home sale, you might be wondering about what your requirements are in terms of home inspections. A vital step in the closing process, professional home inspections are typically included in real estate contracts as a contingency (the sale is dependent upon their completion).

But, are there any situations in which a seller would get a home inspection?

In today’s post, we’re going to talk about why sellers might want to get their home inspection and how it could be useful to the home sale process overall.

To diagnose problems with your home

When you’re deciding on the asking price of your home, you’ll want to take into account all of the things that could potentially drive that price down. Inspectors will look for a number of issues in your home, which can save you from any surprises when a potential buyer orders their inspection of your home.

The further along in the home sale process when you discover an expensive repair that needs to be made, the more complicated it makes your home sale.

So, if you’re in any doubt about whether your home will need repairs now or in the near future, ordering an inspection could be a safe option.

What do inspectors look for?

When inspecting your home, a licensed professional will look at several things:

  • Exterior components of your home, such as cracks or broken seals on exterior surfaces, garage door function and safety, and so on.

  • The structural integrity of your home; checking your foundation for dangerous cracks where moisture can enter and cause damage in the form of mold or breaks in the foundation.

  • The roof of your home will be checked for things like broken or loose shingles or nearby tree branches that could damage your home or nearby power lines in a storm.

  • The HVAC system will be tested to make sure it’s running properly and efficiently and also that vents are clean and clear of debris.

  • Interior components of your home will be checked for safety and damage from things like pests and water damage.

Will the seller still order an inspection if my home just had one?

An inspection contingency is built into almost all real estate contracts to protect the interests of the buyer and seller alike.

In most circumstances, a buyer will want to get their own inspection performed. After all, they don’t know who you went to for an inspection and whether they were licensed in your state.

The bottom line

Ultimately, if you’re planning on selling your home in the near future and aren’t sure if your home may have any underlying issues, it’s usually a good idea to get an inspection to make sure you can plan for any repairs or inform potential buyers of any issues with your home.


Ready to choose a home inspector before you finalize a house purchase? Ultimately, there are many key questions you'll want to ask your home inspector to ensure he or she has what it takes to assess a house, including:

1. What are your qualifications?

Choosing a home inspector who understands the ins and outs of reviewing a property is paramount. Thus, you'll want to evaluate a candidate's credentials closely to guarantee he or she knows how to inspect all aspects of a residence.

Find out about a home inspector's skills and background. By doing so, you can understand how this professional has approached home inspections in the past.

Also, retrieve copies of a home inspector's past house evaluations and find out if he or she is a member of national or state home inspector associations. Evaluating a home inspector's past reports will provide you with an example of what to expect from this professional during your home assessment. Meanwhile, a home inspector who is a member of a national or state home inspector association likely possesses training and certifications that may help him or her stand out from other home inspectors in your area.

2. Can you provide references?

Were past clients satisfied or dissatisfied with a home inspector? Ask a home inspector to provide references, and you'll be able to learn about past clients' experiences in no time at all.

Don't forget to check out client reviews on Yelp, Angie's List and other professional review websites too. This will enable you to better understand if a particular home inspector is the right professional to assess your residence.

3. Do you possess errors and omissions insurance?

In some instances, a home inspector may make mistakes during a house assessment that he or she probably should have noticed. If a home inspector possesses errors and omissions insurance, however, you may be protected in this scenario.

Errors and omissions insurance offers professional liability coverage for home inspectors. This means a home inspector who holds errors and omissions insurance will be able to cover the costs associated with an error that you feel he or she should have caught during a house inspection.

Be on the lookout for a home inspector who will require you to sign a waiver limiting his or her liability as well. If a home inspector requires a waiver, you may be held responsible for any home problems that this professional misses during a house assessment.

Searching for a home inspector can be tricky, especially if you're trying to navigate a complex homebuying process. But if you spend some time reviewing a broad array of home inspectors, you should have no trouble finding a home inspector who can meet or exceed your expectations.

Don't forget to rely on your real estate agent for support as you search for a qualified home inspector. Your real estate agent may be able to recommend home inspectors in your area and help take the guesswork out of discovering the ideal home inspector so you can finalize your house purchase.